Author Topic: Osteochondrits  (Read 14364 times)

uwalker

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Osteochondrits
« on: February 14, 2014, 03:09:36 AM »
My son and I recently were informed he as OCD.  He is 11 years and and active.  His knee was injured playing baseball. As he slid into home plate the catcher  drove on his knee in an attempt to retrieve the baseball.  MRI and Xray indicated an area on his fibula that was rough instead of smooth.  Dr. stated the area lacked blood circulation and recommended to pull him out of sports complete for 6 months to allow the bone/trauma area to heal. 

Do you have a product to recommend that may help?
Are your products one size fits all or do you have youth sizes and adult?

Osteochondritis Dissecans of Knee (OCD)

What is osteochondritis dissecans (OCD)?

A lesion of the cartilage and bone due to necrosis and loss of continuity of the underlying bone. The OCD lesion can remain in contact with the adjacent bone, maybe partially separated or completely separated. The articular cartilage surface may be intact or may be breached allowing communication of the joint fluid with the bone.

Alison

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Re: Osteochondrits
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2014, 07:32:38 PM »
Hi Uwalker and thank you for your interest in King Brand.

Osteochondritis Dissecans, also known as OCD or OD occurs when a fragment of bone in a joint separates from the rest of the bone because its blood supply was faulty - it was not getting enough blood to keep it alive. Sometimes, the separated fragment of bone stays in place; if it falls into the joint space, however, there will be pain and the joint may not work properly. The joint, usually the knee or elbow becomes inflamed, sore and painful and will 'give way' - it catches and locks during movement.

Osteochondritis dissecans can occur in different joints, including the hip and ankle. The knee is most commonly affected. According to health authorities in the USA, OCD more commonly affects males aged between 10 and 20 years who do a lot of sports. OCD is more common among males and females who take part in active sports regularly. Because their bones are still growing, adolescents are more likely than adults to recover from OCD; recovery in adolescents can be attributed to the bone's ability to repair damaged or dead bone tissue and cartilage in a process called bone remodeling.

Our BFST wraps would certainly help to increase the blood flow in your son's knee.  Our ColdCure knee wrap would help with the swelling and inflammation of his knee which will also help to reduce the pain.

We do not have child/youth sizes for our wraps however they are very versatile and wrap around the knee and close with velcro as apposed to many wraps that you have to pull up the leg.

I would recommend the knee wraps although, depending on his size, our elbow wrap could be used instead for smaller children's knees.

I hope I have answered all your questions, however, if you need more information, please let us know.



uwalker

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Re: Osteochondrits
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2014, 02:50:19 AM »
I will give them a shot.. Initial recommendation is 6 months without sports.. I am hopeful your products can speed his recovery.

Thank you.